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Pedestrian Safety-Be Careful Out There

October is National Pedestrian Safety Month, a reminder to be careful out there, whether walking, driving, or riding, by yourself or with others.


If you’re driving...

  1. Watch for pedestrians everywhere, at all times. Be attentive, especially around schools and neighborhoods where children are present.

  2. Pay attention to traffic controls and speed limits, especially in school zones and neighborhoods.

  3. Slow down and be prepared to stop when turning or otherwise entering a crosswalk.

  4. Never pass vehicles stopped at a crosswalk. There may be people crossing that you can’t see.

  5. When turning, yield to people walking and biking.

  6. Do not assume the pedestrian sees (or hears) you.

  7. Turn on your headlights and use extra caution when driving in hard-to-see conditions, such as nighttime or bad weather.

  8. Be cautious when backing up – pedestrians, especially young children, can move across your path.

  9. Avoid all distractions, including texting or talking on cellphones and/or eating or drinking, when behind the wheel.

  10. Never drive impaired.


If you’re walking...

  1. Walk on sidewalks whenever possible. If one isn’t available, walk facing traffic and as far from traffic as possible.

  2. When possible, cross the street at intersections or marked crosswalks, and look for cars in both directions, including those turning.

  3. Do not cross in the middle of a street or between cars.

  4. Before crossing, look left, right, and left again. Continuously watch for traffic as you cross the street.

  5. Watch for turning vehicles, even if there is a “No turn on red” sign.

  6. Be extra careful crossing streets or entering crosswalks at night when it is harder to see or when crossing busier roads with more lanes and higher speed limits.

  7. Watch for cars entering or exiting driveways or backing up in parking lots.

  8. Be visible. Wear something light or reflective after dark.

  9. Watch out for blind spots around trucks and buses.

  10. Stay alert at all times. Don’t be distracted by electronic devices that take your eyes (and ears) off the road, especially when crossing the street.


Speak up. If you think a driver is engaging in dangerous behavior (texting? telephone use, make-up, other distractions) say something."

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